Flying back home

Today is the last leg of our journey home, the one where we get on a plane to Johannesburg and finally to Amsterdam. It also marks the last day in Namibia, and the last day of our trip to southern Africa. I’m really quite sad that it ends already, as we’ve had an absolute blast over here!

The owner of the game farm has decorated his house with some of the animals he farms, including a full size giraffe. Yes, that picture indeed features a mounted bust of a giraffe. 0_o

The trip to Windhoek airport was rather uneventful, and we fuelled it up without any issues near to the airport. The guys from the rental company didn’t even complain about the absolute state we left the car in: “It’s Namibia, it’ll get dirty over here!” was their response. Yay!

There only was one oddity on the flight to Johannesburg: the meals we were served actually differed from each other. We both had ‘meat’, but one was a pie with chicken, and the other was a beef pastrami sandwich. Being served two different meals which are supposed to be the same on a plane is really peculiar, and we were as baffled as the flight attendants! The flight back home (after a long wait in South Africa) was long and sleepless for me, and was in a plane from KLM Asia. 😉

Driving to Namibia

With a full tank of diesel and 4 working tyres, we start the 530km long first leg towards Windhoek. It will take us from Maun (Botswana) to a lodge just outside of Buitepos (Namibia) and back from the lush green world to the arid dry land.

The lodge we are staying at is called Kalahari Bush Breaks, and they offer a 4×4 track on their land. Besides catering the tourists, it also is a working game farm, which means they have about 22 species of animals living on the farm which are bred for their meat and hide. The track is meant to provide the users a nice way to view the game, but it proved to be just a little too much for our Duster.

The ground clearance of the car is just too little for us to drive the track as we almost got stuck, after which we decided to turn around and drive back. We got to about half of the 22km track, and it turned out to be a good decision. Tim & Rosaline have a car with much more ground clearance, and they informed us that there was at least another point where we would have gotten ourselves in trouble. In the end, it is just not worth it. We started the drive together, as we were unsure what it would bring. 

Our room overlooks a water hole which is lit by night, and we drank the last of their beers sitting on our porch while viewing the Water Buck, Kudu and Impala, while listening to a male Impala trying to impress the females by grunting and barking. Quite amusing yet rather scary as the noise that small animal makes is really low and loud. You wouldn’t guess that it was an Impala making that sound.